Latest MPIA Science Highlights

List is filtered with:

reset filter
Original 1560518541

Two Earth-like planets around one of the smallest stars, and a slim chance someone there might see Earth

June 18, 2019
An international team of astronomers has found two Earth-like planets around one of the smallest known stars known as “Teegarden’s star.” The planets, which orbit in the star’s habitable zone where liquid water is possible, are only a quarter and a third more massive than the Earth, respectively. The discovery helps complete our picture of the statistics of exoplanet prevalence, correcting implicit biases in earlier observations. Incidentally, hypothetical observers on those planets would soon be in a uniquely favorable position to detect our Earth, using the so-called transit method. The results have just been published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. [more]
Original 1553620081

Exoplanet under the looking glass

March 27, 2019
New method allows precise determination of exoplanet's spectra and position [more]
Original 1553705753

One helium droplet at a time

March 25, 2019
Simulating nature’s cosmic laboratory [more]
Original 1548248122

As clouds fall apart, a new star is born

January 24, 2019
New observations reveal the physics behind the formation of a massive star cluster [more]
Original 1541689444

A Cold Super-Earth in our Neighbourhood

November 14, 2018
An international group of astronomers, involving the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA) in Heidelberg, has succeeded in detecting a planet around Barnard's star, which is only six lightyears away. The planet has just over three times the mass of Earth and is slightly colder than Saturn. The discovery was made by measuring the periodic change in the radial velocity of the parent star. The spectrograph CARMENES, developed to a large part by the MPIA, played an important role in this discovery. [more]
 
loading content
Go to Editor View