Frontiers of Stellar Spectroscopy

in the Local Group and Beyond

MPIA Heidelberg, 27-30 April 2015





The challenges of stellar radiative transfer techniques, and their application to a variety of astrophysical problems, from the atmospheres of exoplanets to the integrated spectra of galaxies.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Hot stars: O stars, Wolf-Rayets, White Dwarfs
  • Cool stars: Red giants and supergiants, AGB stars, Cepheids and Solar-type stars
  • Supernovae: Core-collapse and Type Ia
  • Unresolved stellar systems: massive young clusters, globular clusters, galaxies
  • Exoplanets and their host stars
  •  

    Important Dates


    - Abstract deadline: February 15th - closed



    - 1st announcement: 1 December

    - Early registration (EUR 80): December 20th

    - Normal registration (EUR 115): February 15th

    - Late registration (EUR 150): March 15th or on-site





    Spectroscopy of stars and stellar populations in the Milky Way and other galaxies of the Local Group has recently experienced several major steps forward. Firstly, several decades of progress in theory of radiative transfer have resulted in extremely sophisticated models which incorporate the detailed physics of stellar atmospheres in all evolutionary stages, from pre-main-sequence through to supernovae and white dwarfs. Considerable effort is currently going into the construction of large databases of 3D NLTE model atmospheres, with the goal of enabling fast and accurate automated spectral modelling.

    Meanwhile, several new spectrographs have been commissioned, with unprecedented capabilities and sensitivities, and analysis techniques are now being tuned to match the wavelength ranges and resolving powers of the new instrument facilities. Multi-object spectrographs, particularly in the infrared (such MUSE and KMOS at the VLT) are revolutionizing the field, and opening new perspectives for Survey Spectroscopy. Large surveys from the ground (e.g. GAIA-ESO, APOGEE, RAVE, HERMES) and space (Gaia) are opening up new avenues with which to study the evolution of the Milky Way. Efforts are underway to adapt the techniques to forthcoming facilities (e.g. WHT/WEAVE, VLT/MOONS, VISTA/4MOST, JWST), different types of stars, wavelength windows (optical, IR), and data quality (low- and high resolving power).

    By pushing both the data and the analysis techniques to their limits it is possible to move beyond the Milky Way and perform detailed studies of stars in external galaxies in the Local Group and even beyond. For the first time we are able to fully map the present-day chemical and kinematical structure of hundreds of external galaxies, studying their evolution in time. Rapid-response spectroscopy of supernova explosions allows us to push out further still. Not only is this a unique opportunity to study the formation and evolution of stars in different environments and cosmic nucleosynthesis, but accurate knowledge of the stars' abundances allows us to use them as tracers of the host galaxy's star-forming history and ultimately understand the first and second order mechanisms that have taken place in galaxy evolution.

    Closer to home, quantitative survey spectroscopy is for the first time being exploited as a tool to study the formation and evolution of exoplanetary systems. Large aperture telescopes and gains in sensitivity, particularly in the infrared, mean that we can routinely obtain spectroscopy of planetary atmospheres as they pass behind their host stars. Meanwhile, the remains of planetary material are being studied as the exo- asteroids impact on the surfaces of their dead parent white-dwarf stars.

    In this workshop, experts in spectroscopy of low- and high-mass stars, and unresolved stellar popuations will come together to discuss the challenges that face the field of spectroscopy, how these challenges are overcome, the information that may be extracted, and the scientific questions in stellar physics and evolution of galaxies that may ultimately be tackled.






    Invited Speakers

  • Anna Frebel (MIT, USA)
  • Coryn Bailer-Jones (MPIA)
  • Tim Beers (Notre Dame, USA)
  • Janet Colucci (Carnegie Obs., USA)
  • Charlie Conroy (CfA, Harvard, USA)
  • Luc Dessart (Obs. de la Cote d'Azur, France)
  • Chris Evans (UKATC Edinburgh, UK)
  • Sofia Feltzing (Lund, Sweden)
  • Boris Gaensicke (Warwick, UK)
  • Avishay Gal-Yam (Weizmann Inst., Israel)
  • Gerry Gilmore (IoA, Cambridge)
  • Eva Grebel (ARI, Germany)
  • Camilla J. Hansen (Dark Cosmology, Denmark)
  • Artemio Herrero (IAC, Spain)
  • Georges Kordopatis (AIP, Germany)
  • Bertrand Lemasle (APIfA, Netherlands)
  • Karin Lind (Uppsala, Sweden)
  • Michael Line (UCSC, USA)
  • Paolo Mazzali (JMU, Liverpool, UK)
  • Jorge Melendez (Sao Paulo, Brazil)
  • Francisco Najarro (CSIC, Madrid, Spain)
  • Max Pettini (Cambridge, UK)
  • Hans-Walter Rix (MPIA, Germany)
  • Ricardo Schiavon (JMU, Liverpool, UK)
  • Else Starkenburg (AIP, Germany)
  • Pier-Emmanuel Tremblay (STScI, USA)
  • Miguel Urbaneja (UIBK, Austria)
  • Jakob Walcher (AIP, Germany)
  • SOC

  • Maria Bergemann (co-chair) (Heidelberg, Germany)
  • Ben Davies (co-chair) (JMU, Liverpool, UK)
  • Martin Asplund (ANU, Australia)
  • Giuseppe Bono (Rome, Italy)
  • Jay Farihi (UCL, UK)
  • John Hillier (Pittsburg, USA)
  • David Sing (Exeter, UK)
  • Eline Tolstoy (Groningen, Netherlands)
  • LOC

  • Maria Bergemann (chair)
  • Suzanne Koltes-Al-Zoubi
  • Markus Poessel
  • Sigrid Bruemmer
  • Valeriy Vasilyev







  • Important Dates

    - 1st announcement: 1 December

    - Early registration (EUR 80): December 20th

    - Abstract deadline: February 15th - closed

    - Normal registration (EUR 115): February 15th

    - Late registration (EUR 150): March 15th or on-site





    Registration and Abstract submission

    - closed

    You can register and pay in cash on-site (150 Euro). Refund of conference fee is no longer possible.





    Poster guidelines

    Please prepare your poster in the standard A0 (portrait) format.







    Conference Venue

    The conference will take place at the House of Astronomy operated by the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA).


    Accomodation

    We have reserved a number of rooms in several hotels in Heidelberg from April 25 – May 1. The are all located within a 5-10 minute walk from the bus stop that will take participants to the conference venue, Max-Planck Institute of Astronomy. The rooms have been reserved for our conference until the 15 of March and can be booked for special rates with the quote “Spectroscopy Conference”.

    Hotel Kohler (map): 20 rooms available
    www.hotel-kohler.de
    Tel: +49(0)6221-970097

    Hotel 4 Jahreszeiten: 20 rooms available
    www.4-jahreszeiten.de
    Tel: +49(0)6221-24164

    Hotel Boarding House: 15 rooms available
    www.boardinghouse-hd.de/en
    Tel: +49(0)6221-434050

    Hotel "Goldene Rose": 10 rooms available
    rate 90 Euro
    www.hotel-goldene-rose.de
    Tel.: +49(0)6221-905490

    Guesthouse Heidelberg: 10 rooms available
    rates 77 Euro
    www.guesthouse-hd.de Tel.: +49(0)6221-872710

    International Transportation

    Heidelberg is located not far away from the largest German Airport: Frankfurt am Main (Airport code: FRA). From there, there are three ways to get to Heidelberg:

    • Booking train tickets on bahn.de from "Frankfurt Airport" to "Heidelberg Hbf" (Hauptbahnhof-Main Train Station). Passengers will have to change trains in Mannheim.
    • Taking the Lufthansa Shuttle to the hotel district in Heidelberg.
    • Take a TLS shuttle

    Daily Transportation in Heidelberg

    Daily buses to the MPIA and back to the downtown will be provided for the conference participants. The two buses will leave Heidelberg at 8:15 am and depart from MPIA at 18:15.

    Childcare during the conference

    We will be able to organise professional childcare free of charge for the families of the participants. However the number of places is limited. Please let us know by the 30th of January if you would like to use this service.






    Conference

    Frontiers of stellar spectroscopy in the Local Group and Beyond

     

    Location:        Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA),
    House of Astronomy/Haus der Astronomie,
    Heidelberg, 69117, Germany

    Dates:              27 – 30 April, 2015

    Organisers:     Maria Bergemann (MPIA Heidelberg), Ben Davies (LJMU, Liverpool)

    LOC:                Susanne Koltes, Markus Poessel, Sigrid Bruemmer
    Emergency contact: +49-6221-528-401,  +49-6221-528-408

     

    Programme

     

    Day 1, 27 April

    Activity/Time

    Presenter

    Title

    Monday AM

     

     

    Session 1 – Cool stars

     

    09:05 – 09:40

    H.-W. Rix

    Spectroscopic surveys in the context of galaxy evolution

     

    09:40 – 10:10

    G. Gilmore

    The Chemical Evolution of the Milky Way

     

    10:10 – 10:40

    R. Schiavon

    Star Formation History of Galaxies

    10:40 – 11:00

    Coffee

     

     

     

    11:00 – 11:30

    S. Feltzing

    Survey Spectroscopy

     

    11:30 - 12:00

    C. Bailer-Jones

    Stellar parameter estimation in Gaia

     

    12:00 - 12:30

    G. Kordopatis

    Spectroscopic analysis methods and pipelines

    12:30 – 14:00

    Lunch

     

     

    Monday PM

     

     

    Session 1 – Cool stars

     

    14:00 – 14:30

    J. Colucci

    High Resolution Spectroscopy of Globular Clusters

     

    14:30 – 14:45

    M. Ness

    The Cannon: a data-driven approach to stellar label determination

     

    14:45 – 15:00

    J. Lin

    The first results from the GALAH survey

     

    15:00 – 15:15

    M. Asplund

    The peculiar solar chemical composition

     

    15:15 – 15:30

    R. Schoenrich

    Bayesian Spectroscopy

    15:30 - 16:00

    Coffee

     

     

     

    16:00 – 16:30

    K. Lind

    Modelling the spectra of cool star atmospheres

     

    16:30 – 16:45

    A. Dupree

    Stellar Abundances and Chromospheric Models

     

    16:45 – 17:00

    S. Lindgren

    Metallicity determination for M dwarfs from high-resolution IR spectra

     

    17:00 – 17:15

    C. Worley

    Searching for AGBs: Signatures from a homogeneous analysis

     

    17:15 – 17:30

    A. Mucciarelli

    The impact of NLTE on the globular cluster metallicity

     

    17:30 – 17:45

    A. Amarsi

    Three-dimensional non-equilibrium line synthesis of atomic Oxygen

     

    17:45 – 18:00

    S. Kondo

    Studies of late type stars with z-, Y-, J-bands high-resolution spectrograph, WINERED

     

     

     

     

    Day 2, 28 April

    Type/Time

    Speaker

    Title

    Tuesday AM

     

     

    Session 2 – Hot stars and Supernovae

     

    09:00 – 09:30

    M. Urbaneja

    Massive Stars as extragalactic abundance probes

     

    09:30 - 10:00

    C. Evans

    Galaxy-wide surveys of massive stars

     

    10:00 – 10:30

    A. Herrero

    Massive stars in nearby galaxies: paving the way for the deep Universe

    10:30 – 11:00

    Coffee

     

     

     

    11:00 – 11:30

    P. Najarro

    Massive stars in the Galactic Centre 

     

    11:30 – 11:45

    U. Heber

    Chemical tagging of hot run-away and hyper-velocity stars

     

     

    11:45 – 12:00

    D. Bomans

    Spectroscopic analysis methods and pipelinesMUSE Spectroscopy of Massive Stars in the Dwarf Galaxy IC 4870

     

    12:00 – 12:15

    S. Geier

    Chemical peculiarities in the atmospheres of hot subdwarf stars

     

    12:15 – 12:30

    J. Bestenlehner

    Automated stellar parameters for emission line stars

     

     

     

     

    12:30 – 14:00

    Lunch

     

     

    Tuesday PM

    Inv. talks

     

    Session 2 – Hot stars and Supernovae

     

    14:00 – 14:30

    P. Mazzalli

    Type Ia Supernovae review

     

    14:30 – 15:00

    L. Dessart

    Spectroscopic analysis of core-collapse SNe

     

    15:00 – 15:30

    A. Gal-Yam

    Supernova flash spectroscopy: a new observational window into stellar death

    15:30 – 16:00

    Coffee

     

     

     

    16:00 – 16:30

    P.-E. Tremblay

    Stellar Evolution and Galactic Archaeology with White Dwarfs

     

    16:30 – 16:45

    S. Caballero-Nieves

    A spectroscopic view of R136 with Hubble

     

    16:45 – 17:00

    M. Garcia

    Crossing the frontier of the SMC: insights from joint UV+optical spectroscopy of massive stars

     

    17:00 – 17:30

    J. Hillier

    Recent Successes in Modeling Type Ia SNe

     

    17:30 – 17:45

    K. Weis

    He 3-519 - a LBV on the way to retirement ?

     

    17:45 – 18:00

    I. Camacho

    Improving the O-abundance determination of IC1613

     

     

     

     

    Day 3, 29 April

    Type/Time

    Speaker

    Title

    Wednesday AM

     

     

    Session 3 – Stellar populations and galaxies

     

    09:00 – 09:30

    E. Grebel

    Stellar populations in the Local Group galaxies

     

    09:30 – 10:00

    M. Pettini

    A Critical Look at Metallicity Determinations in Star-forming Galaxies at High

     

    10:00 – 10:15

    M. Bergemann

    Red supergiants as cosmic abundance probes: theory

     

    10:15 – 10:30

    B. Davies

    Red supergiants as cosmic abundance probes: observations

    10:30 – 11:00

    Coffee

     

     

     

    11:00 – 11:30

    J. Walcher

    Spectra of unresolved stellar systems

     

    11:30 – 12:00

    C. Conroy

    Extragalactic Archeology

     

    12:00 – 12:15

    T.-O. Husser

    Resolving stellar populations with MUSE

     

    12:15 – 12:30

    C. Lardo

    First direct metallicity measurement of the Antennae interacting galaxies

    12:30 – 14:00

    Lunch

     

     

    Wednesday PM

     

     

    Session 3 – Stellar populations and galaxies

     

    14:00 – 14:30

    A. Frebel

    The ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Segue 1: Is is a surviving first galaxy

     

    14:30 – 15:00

    E. Starkenburg

    Observing metal-poor stars in the satellites of the Milky Way

     

    15:00 – 15:15

    L. Mashonkina

    NLTE analysis of very metal-poor stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies

     

    15:15 – 15:30

    M. Lamb

    IR analysis of spectral of cool metal-poor stars

    15:30 – 16:00

    Coffee

     

     

     

    16:00 – 16:30

    T. Beers

    The chemical signatures of first-generation massive and very-massive stars

     

    16:30 – 17:00

    C. Hansen

    Tracing exotic nucleosynthesis processes using low-metallicity stars

     

    17:00 – 17:15

    G. Ruchti

    Hunting for debris in the Galactic disk

     

    17:15 – 17:30

    B. Dias

    Three ways to go from globular cluster stars to formation and evolution of galaxies

     

    17:30 – 17:45

    F. Liu

    Chemical inhomogeneity in the Hyades

     

    Dinner

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Day 4,30 April

    Type/Time

    Speaker

    Title

    Thursday AM

    Inv. talks

     

    Session 6 – Stellar populations and galaxies

     

    09:00 – 09:30

    B. Lemasle

    Examining the chemical evolution of the Milky way using yellow supergiants

     

    09:30 – 09:45

    G. Bono

    On the metallicity distribution of Galactic thin disk using Cepheids

     

    10:00 – 10:15

    L. Inno

    The Galactic disk chemical abundance gradients as traced by Cepheids

     

    10:15 – 10:30

    N. Sanna

    Near-infrared high-resolution spectroscopy of Galactic classical Cepheids

    10:30 – 11:00

    Coffee

     

     

    Thursday PM

    Inv. talks

     

    Session 7 - Exoplanets

     

    11:00 – 11:30

    B. Gaensicke

    The chemistry of exo-terrestrial material in evolved planetary systems

     

    11:30 - 12:00

    M. Line

    Interpreting spectra of exoplanet and brown dwarf atmospheres

     

    12:00 – 12:15

    S. Xu

    Chemical Compositions of Extrasolar Planetesimals

     

    12:15 – 12:30

    A. Quirrenbach

    CARMENES: M Dwarfs and their Planets

    12:30 – 14:00

    Lunch

     

     

     

    14:00 – 14:30

    J. Melendez

    Chemical abundances of exoplanet host stars

     

    14:30 – 14:45

    A. Korn

    Chemical profiles of stars in M67 and the origin of the Sun

     

    14:45 – 15:00

    J. Farihi

    Ultraviolet Spectral Vision: Rocky Planetary Systems in our Backyard

     

    15:00 – 15:05

     

    Closing

     

     

     

     

     

    15:30

     

    Bus departing to the downtown

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     














    Participants

  • Amarsi, Anish
  • Andersen, Johannes
  • Asad, Randa
  • Asplund, Martin
  • Bailer-Jones, Coryn
  • Beers, Timothy
  • Bomans, Dominik
  • Bono, Giuseppe
  • Caballero-Nieves, Saida
  • Camacho, Ines
  • Colucci, Janet
  • Conroy, Charlie
  • Cordero, Maria
  • Davies, Benjamin
  • De Gennaro Aquino, Ivan
  • Dessart, Luc
  • Dias, Bruno
  • Dupree, Andrea
  • Fabrizio, Michele
  • Farihi, Jay
  • Feltzing, Sofia
  • Frebel, Anna
  • Gaensicke, Boris
  • Gal-Yam, Avishay
  • Geier, Stephan
  • Gilmore, Gerry
  • Gonneau, Anais
  • Gorman, Maire
  • Grebel, Eva
  • Gvaramadze, Vasilii
  • Hansen, Terese
  • Hansen, Camilla
  • Hartman, Henrik
  • Heber, Ulrich
  • Herrero, Artemio
  • Hillier, D. John
  • Ho, Anna
  • Husser, Tim-Oliver
  • Iwasaki, Hitomi
  • Kniazev, Alexei
  • Kondo, Sohei
  • Korn, Andreas
  • Venn, Kim
  • Lamb, Masen
  • Lemasle, Bertrand
  • Lin, Jane
  • Lind, Karin
  • Lindgren, Sara
  • Line, Michael
  • Liu, Fan
  • Liu, Cheng
  • Madore, Barry
  • Matsunaga, Noriyuki
  • Mashonkina, Lyudmila
  • Mazzali, Paolo
  • Melendez, Jorge
  • Mizumoto, Misaki
  • Mucciarelli, Alessio
  • Najarro, Francisco
  • Nemeth, Peter
  • Ness, Melissa
  • Opitsch, Michael
  • Pettini, Max
  • Quirrenbach, Andreas
  • Reffert, Sabine
  • Rix, Hans-Walter
  • Ruchti, Gregory
  • Sanna, Nicoletta
  • Schaffenroth, Veronika
  • Shenar, Tomer
  • Silchenko, Olga
  • Sitnova, Tatyana
  • Skuladottir, Asa
  • Starkenburg, Else
  • Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel
  • Walcher, Jakob
  • Weis, Kerstin
  • Worley, Clare
  • Xu, Siyi








  • Science goes public: New science film about the invisible Universe

    22 January, 2015

    Documentary Science Film

    Scientific conferences are market places of ideas, and a key driver of scientific progress and innovation. But usually they're closed events, where scientists remain among themselves. Not so with the conference “Frontiers of Stellar Spectroscopy”, organized by Maria Bergemann from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg and Ben Davies from LJMU in Liverpool. “Our conference will be accompanied by a film project that brings the most exciting discoveries directly to the public,” says Bergemann, who sees the project as a new way of doing fundamental science in the open, and making it accessible to global audience.

    The film project is a collaboration between the Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, the SFB 881 Milky Way (German Research Society funded project), and professional film makers. It will focus on studies of stars in the Universe which use data from the largest telescopes together with a variety of techniques to create a ‘universe-in-a-box’ – a million-times downsized version of the universe beyond the solar system.

    As Bergemann explains further: “In our films, we will explore some of the key questions of our existence. In the words of Carl Sagan, 'we are star stuff' – the chemicals that make up our bodies were produced in stars. If we want to understand our own origins, then we need to understand the chemistry of stars. Also, the central star is the key to the possibility of life in a distant solar system. Are habitable planets like the Earth ubiquitous, or are they a fluke? We can only answer that question if we know more about the 'climate' of stars within our galaxy.”

    A number of key questions on both stellar chemistry and life-friendly conditions in distant solar systems have had to wait for the advent of today's giant 10 m telescopes, sophisticated computer technology for simulations, and space missions such as the Gaia mission launched in late 2013. The film will explore these new technologies as well as the human side of astronomical research. It will include interviews with expert scientists in the field, and will be distributed to major research and educational institutions world-wide.

    Some of the questions to be addressed in the film are:


    • Will we be able to find planets like the Earth in our Galaxy and in other galaxies?

    • What is atmosphere and climate like on these planets and on their host stars? Is it suitable to develop and sustain life? If yes, what type of life? What are the most complex organic molecules and amino acids in space?

    • What can we learn about the climate on Earth from studies of the properties of stars?

    • What is the origin of the naturally-occuring chemical elements that make up our own bodies, our environment, and everything on Earth?

    • What could be the economic return of exploring chemical resources in the Solar system and under which conditions would it be profitable for the society?
    • What are the properties of solar energy and how will change with time?

    Those interested in supporting the project, should contact Maria Bergemann: spectroscopy@mpia-hd.mpg.de

    If you are interested to participate in the film, please send an email to the organisers describing your interest and the science theme you would like to present in an interview.