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Original 1569400965

When dwarfs give birth to giants

September 26, 2019
A newly discovered exoplanet challenges current models pertaining to planet formation [more]
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Prize awarded by the Spanish Astronomical Society for Conchi Cárdenas Vázquez

September 24, 2019
Best Spanish PhD in instrumentation [more]
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Galactic conveyor belts feed star formation

September 12, 2019
How magnetic fields push the formation of stars [more]
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Biermann Award for Eduardo Bañados

September 10, 2019
Eduardo Bañados, a staff scientist in the Galaxies and Cosmology Department of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, has been named the recipient of the German Astronomical Society's 2019 Ludwig Biermann Award. [more]
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Lise Meitner Research Group for Maria Bergemann

June 25, 2019
Maria Bergemann, scientist in the “Galaxies and Cosmology” department headed by MPIA director Hans-Walter Rix, is to receive support for a research group funded under the new Lise Meitner-Programme of the Max Planck Society (MPG). The group will work in the field of precise astrophysical spectroscopy, stellar populations and cosmic nucleogenesis. [more]
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Thomas Henning - Honorary Member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

June 19, 2019
Prof. Thomas Henning, Director of the Department of Planet- and Star Formation at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, has been elected an honorary member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA). This was announced by the MTA (Hungarian: Magyar Tudományos Akadémia) following its last General Assembly. [more]
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Two Earth-like planets around one of the smallest stars, and a slim chance someone there might see Earth

June 18, 2019
An international team of astronomers has found two Earth-like planets around one of the smallest known stars known as “Teegarden’s star.” The planets, which orbit in the star’s habitable zone where liquid water is possible, are only a quarter and a third more massive than the Earth, respectively. The discovery helps complete our picture of the statistics of exoplanet prevalence, correcting implicit biases in earlier observations. Incidentally, hypothetical observers on those planets would soon be in a uniquely favorable position to detect our Earth, using the so-called transit method. The results have just been published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. [more]
 
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